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Lyle Zapato

The Dactyl Fractal And Dr. Strange

Lyle Zapato | 2017-11-11.0340 LMT | Polydactylism | Entertainment

The above images of Benedict Cumberbatch seemingly achieving Dactyl Fractal Consciousness are from the "Open Your Eye" scene in 2016's Dr. Strange (which I only recently watched, so please excuse the belated blogging and chunky stream-grabbed screenshots).

Now that the mass audience of superhero-movie fans has been exposed to knowledge of the Handlebrot, will the hundredth monkey effect kick in, causing a morphic field to envelop the globe, producing spontaneous dactyl fractal manifestations -- or, should I say, manofestations -- throughout humanity, thus hastening the coming evolutionary epoch of Homo teradactylus?

Well, it's been a year and so far it doesn't seem to be happening.

One potential explanation for this lack of morphogenetic effect could be the source of the movie. Dr. Strange was of course produced by Disney, which observant ZPi readers will know both developed audioanimatronic human-replacement technology (Simulacra androids) and hosts "Belgium" in the increasingly-black-mold-infested vaults under their Euro-Disneyland park; so an extra degree of paranoid suspicion is obviously warranted.

Could Disney have ulterior motives for this mass exposure to dactyl fractal imagery? Might this scene be psyoptically designed not to excite, but to inure the public to Dactyl Fractal Consciousness; not to release, but immure it in a prison of counter-resonant imagery -- a sort of memetic "mirror dimension" where its magic can have no effect on the real world?

Note the Mandelbulbesque environment that Dr. Strange floats in while witnessing his digital transcendence. What formula did the CGI artists use to render this? Was it calculated to negate DFC -- like noise-cancelation, but for finger-fingers? Are all those baroque, undulating indentations actually anti-fingers and Dr. Strange is really in negative handspace? The symbolism of him being pushed there by hand is certainly compelling -- as is the movie's much more overt message that Dr. Strange needs to give up on trying to improve his hands and accept that they will be forever hobbled.

Until more exhaustive psychofractal research can be performed on this scene, I would advise all dactyl fractal aspirants to avoid watching Dr. Strange lest they lose the ability to manofest, or worse, lose fingers.

End of post.